Noun Velocity Definition and Examples


Noun:

Velocity

Pronunciation:

/vɪˈlɒsɪti/

Definition:
1.

noun

The speed of something in a given direction.
  1. 'In many cases, air resistance will produce a drag force which is proportional to the velocity squared.'
  2. 'Clearly, much depends on the direction and magnitude of the velocity and of the strength of the gravitational field.'
  3. 'However, if we can measure the distance to the Sun we can also calculate the velocity of the Earth relative to the Sun.'
  4. 'He noticed Venus move, he was able to determine its direction and its velocity and very importantly he was able to determine its angular diameter.'
  5. 'It dealt only with a specific type of motion: objects moving at a constant velocity.'
  6. 'Since a change in either speed OR direction means a change in velocity, the object's velocity is not constant.'
  7. 'Anti-matter has mass and when mass moves at a high velocity, there is an overall increase in energy.'
  8. 'In 1660, together with Borelli, Viviani measured the velocity of sound by timing the difference between the flash and the sound of a cannon.'
  9. 'The two bodies will meet at a relative velocity of 10.3 kilometers per second.'
  10. 'Hubble discovered that the galaxies are moving away from us with a velocity proportional to their distance.'
  11. 'the tank shot backwards at an incredible velocity'
  12. 'A gauss rifle is a rifle that throws an iron slug at an incredibly high velocity.'
  13. 'The film has nail-biting stunts performed at such velocity you're pinned to the back of your chair just watching.'
  14. 'Having started his corporate career with maximum velocity, Yang now runs another company called Yahoo!'
  15. 'Scientists and inventors are unraveling new technology at incredible velocity.'
  16. 'Time and money appear as commensurate albeit inverse values because of the effect of the velocity of circulation on the accumulation of capital.'
  17. 'John Maynard Keynes challenged the theory in the 1930s, saying that increases in money supply lead to a decrease in the velocity of circulation and that real income, the flow of money to the factors of production, increased.'
((n.) Quickness of motion; swiftness; speed; celerity; rapidity; as, the velocity of wind; the velocity of a planet or comet in its orbit or course; the velocity of a cannon ball; the velocity of light.|--|(n.) Rate of motion; the relation of motion to time, measured by the number of units of space passed over by a moving body or point in a unit of time, usually the number of feet passed over in a second. See the Note under Speed.|--|)


noun, plural velocities.

1. rapidity of motion or operation; swiftness; speed: a high wind velocity.

2. Mechanics. the time rate of change of position of a body in a specified direction.

3. the rate of speed with which something happens; rapidity of action or reaction.


Examples:

"There can be velocity fluctuations."
"There can be velocity gradients."
"There can be velocity fields."
"There can be velocity components."
"There can be velocity rifles."
"There can be velocity measurements."
"There can be velocity joints."
"There can be velocity vs."
"There can be velocity distributions."
"There can be velocity dispersions."
"There can be velocity rounds."
"There can be velocity people."
"There can be velocity widths."
"There can be velocity vectors."
"There can be velocity values."
"There can be velocity shots."
"There can be velocity ranges."
"There can be velocity limitations."
"There can be velocity deficits."
"There can be velocity cyclones."
"velocities can up people/places/organizations along heres."
"velocities can take markets by surprises."
"velocities can play parts in sets."
"velocities can up along heres."
"velocities can lie between people/places/organizations."
"velocities can vary with distances."
"velocities can take by surprises."
"velocities can rise from centres."
"velocities can refer to points."
"velocities can refer to numbers."
"velocities can point in mechanisms."
"velocities can play in sets."
"velocities can occur in models."
"velocities can lie at points."
"velocities can increase under influences."
"velocities can go on increasings."
"velocities can go in response to fields."
"velocities can fluctuate in ranges."
"velocities can fall in periods."
"velocities can depend on variables."

Origin:
Late Middle English: from French vélocité or Latin velocitas, from velox, veloc- ‘swift’.

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