Noun Van-courier Definition and Examples


Noun:

Van-courier

Pronunciation:

/ˈkʊrɪə/

Definition:
1.

noun

A company or employee of a company that transports commercial packages and documents.
  1. as modifier 'a courier service'
  2. 'Every day, companies such as yours, entrust their data tapes to couriers or service providers.'
  3. 'Arrive at the airport on time to meet a courier service representative.'
  4. 'Most of the world's major courier companies have integrated their air courier and cargo services with distribution, logistics and warehousing management services.'
  5. 'About two and a half years ago, I hired someone to be the operations manager of my courier company.'
  6. 'Sticking to our roadway analogy, long-haul trucking may be more sensitive to throughput, while a courier service may be more demanding on latency.'
  7. 'The court this week ruled that a courier company was liable for injuries its bicycle courier inflicted on a pedestrian, because the courier was an employee rather than an independent contractor.'
  8. 'Until recently, delivery to the mainland was at times unreliable but a new courier service is in place and next day delivery is guaranteed.'
  9. 'The only problem I've found is the courier service they use - who are fond of leaving packages on your doorstep when nobody is home.'
  10. 'The package was delivered to the factory by a courier company on Wednesday.'
  11. 'Its services are divided into several groups of which photo copying and a courier service are the most important.'
  12. 'They forged documents, collected arms, and were couriers to the Warsaw underground.'
  13. 'When Gregory is shot down over France, Charlotte becomes an undercover courier whose desire to fight with the French Resistance is driven primarily by the hope of finding her new lover.'
  14. 'They served as clerks and couriers, telephone and telegraph operators, code and cipher analysts, and spies behind enemy lines in Europe.'
  15. 'You see, I've already organized a spy network there - I could use an extra courier.'
  16. 'It was during this period when many bouviers accepted their most dangerous task yet, serving as couriers for the Nazi resistance movement in Holland and other areas of northern Europe.'
  17. 'Additional stories tell how others put their lives on the line as spies, soldiers, and couriers.'
  18. 'They were spies, and couriers to their parents.'
A person employed to guide and assist a group of tourists.
  1. 'The fun began in the South of France when I was a tour courier.'
  2. 'Every coach will have a courier and it will be the best-managed coach operation ever.'

verb

Send (goods or documents) by courier.
  1. 'I got an e-mail an hour later telling me that a replacement book was couriered and if the original ever showed up to please mail it back (it never did).'
  2. 'I've sent her a large bouquet of flowers and couriered her some photos of her great-grandchildren both of which she was very happy to receive.'
  3. 'David would fax me little sketches of his ideas and I would source fabrics to be couriered to him in New York.'
  4. 'All the luggage that we know of has been couriered back to each of the passengers or they have come in and picked it up.'
  5. 'The garments arrived this week, neatly packed and couriered from Hong Kong.'
  6. 'I have just been made aware by the respondents here that they couriered out some documents to me yesterday, which I have not got - I never received…'
  7. 'The cinema in digital video disc format can even be couriered to the exhibitor, thus saving on the expenditure and time taken for transporting the cans.'
  8. 'The specimen of only 150 millilitres was couriered to laboratories where several million stem cells were successfully extracted.'
  9. 'I had the documents couriered over as quickly as I could.'
  10. 'Instead, the movie will be stored in a high-capacity disk drive about double the size of a cigarette pack, which will be couriered to the hall, where the film can be downloaded to the server.'
((n.) One sent in advance; an avant-courier; a precursor.)


Origin:
Late Middle English (denoting a person sent to run with a message): originally from Old French coreor; later from French courier (now courrier), from Italian corriere; based on Latin currere ‘to run’.

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