Noun Accident Definition and Examples


Noun:

Accident

Pronunciation:

/ˈaksɪd(ə)nt/

Definition:
1.

noun

An unfortunate incident that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in damage or injury.
  1. mass noun 'if you are unable to work owing to accident or sickness'
  2. 'I have heard of injuries from similar accidents, but none as severe as this.'
  3. 'However the damages and injuries from the accidents so far this year surpassed those of last year.'
  4. 'Your liability coverage will protect you if you cause an accident that results in damage or injuries, up to the limits of your policy.'
  5. 'In the most favourable situation, there is only material damage, but often an accident causes physical injuries or even death.'
  6. 'Except Lucio just had a bone removed from his hip and put into his wrist, to help him recover from a motorcycle accident injury, so it's down to me and Dave to cook.'
  7. 'Casualties who suffered less serious injuries in accidents also fell from 492 to 306 in Hampshire and from 96 to 80 in Southampton.'
  8. 'Co-ordinator of the scheme, Inspector Mick Melia, believes it has played a big role in cutting down accidents, injuries and fatalities.'
  9. 'Over a three-year period there has to have been four accidents involving deaths and serious injuries and eight accidents where victims have needed medical treatment.'
  10. 'Each year, more than 37,000 women die from accidents.'
  11. 'Air accident investigators are probing the cause of the incident.'
  12. 'A campaign has been launched to reduce the speed limit on a road following an accident where a car landed on its roof in a field.'
  13. 'Each year more than 200 people are rescued from vehicles involved in road accidents in North Yorkshire, a greater number than those rescued from fires.'
  14. 'Both Salford and Manchester city councils say there are currently unaware of any pending claims resulting from road accidents involving cars on tram lines.'
  15. 'These are some of the kind of vehicles contributing to the accidents on the roads.'
  16. 'Currently the only call-outs that Grassington does not cover are road traffic accidents and aircraft crashes because it does not have the specialist cutting equipment required.'
  17. 'He suffered no injuries in the accident, and his lorry was left with only minor damage.'
  18. 'There has been a 20% rise in the numbers of people killed in road accidents involving police cars.'
  19. 'In 1983, this 25-year-old woman was involved in a car accident on a Missouri road that left her in a vegetative state.'
  20. 'In the last year I've witnessed four road accidents where only one vehicle was involved.'
  21. 'But in 1971 doctors had thought she would not live after being critically injured in a car accident in Thornton Road.'
  22. 'he had a little accident, but I washed his shorts out'
An event that happens by chance or that is without apparent or deliberate cause.
  1. 'it is no accident that Manchester has produced more than its fair share of professional comics'
  2. 'He got hold of the property by the merest accident, and as soon as he did he began his work by attacking three unfortunate orphans on the estate.'
  3. 'As soon as you examine the alternative you see what good fortune this accident of human demographics has bestowed on us.'
  4. 'There are no accidents, only nature exercising her supremacy.'
  5. 'It's no accident that continental systems have more money and more resources: patients choose to spend their money on health because they can see that it is put to good to use.'
  6. 'Perhaps it is no accident that this event was held in a teaching institution.'
  7. 'Perhaps it was no accident that the two events coincided, since the association between oysters and sex has been so hackneyed as to become an embarrassing cliché.'
  8. 'Yet the war did not really result from bad luck or accident; beneath a contingent process lay profound causes.'
  9. 'Systematicity may exist in connectionist architectures, but where it exists, it is no more than a lucky accident.'
  10. 'Hegel explicitly denies - and it would in any case be quite out of keeping with his whole line of thought - that the direction of history is some kind of fortunate accident.'
  11. 'Was the wrong button on somebody's computer, which brought events to light, an accident or deliberate?'
  12. 'members belong to the House of Lords through hereditary right or accident of birth'
  13. 'A child's accident of birth should not preclude a broad, critical, tolerant education.'
  14. 'All to make sure that the children get the opportunities they were denied by mere accident of birth.'
  15. 'Although Colin Byrne was hooked on golf from an early age his transformation into one of the world's leading caddies was more accident than destiny.'
  16. 'Of course nepotism is a wonderful thing, and James is to be congratulated for making the most of this happy accident of birth.'
  17. 'Success is not a matter of chance, or an accident of birth.'
  18. 'By mere accident of birth I happen to be British.'
  19. 'An accident of birth made me native to New York City where I grew but didn't flourish.'
  20. 'Life formed through a fantastic combination of random chances and evolutionary accidents.'
  21. 'By accident of birth, most, but not all American leaders, were born in the United States.'
  22. 'By accident of history and geography, the balance of seats in Parliament never accurately reflects the balance of votes cast.'
(in Aristotelian thought) a property of a thing which is not essential to its nature.
  1. 'It is only when we call it ‘black’ that we introduce a new entity into the structure, an accident.'
  2. 'The new element is existence, which Avicenna regarded as an accident, a property of things.'
  3. 'Sounds do have certain mathematically expressible accidents, but the science of proportions does not establish the substance or nature of sounds.'
((n.) Literally, a befalling; an event that takes place without one's foresight or expectation; an undesigned, sudden, and unexpected event; chance; contingency; often, an undesigned and unforeseen occurrence of an afflictive or unfortunate character; a casualty; a mishap; as, to die by an accident.|--|(n.) A property attached to a word, but not essential to it, as gender, number, case.|--|(n.) A point or mark which may be retained or omitted in a coat of arms.|--|(n.) A property or quality of a thing which is not essential to it, as whiteness in paper; an attribute.|--|(n.) A quality or attribute in distinction from the substance, as sweetness, softness.|--|(n.) Any accidental property, fact, or relation; an accidental or nonessential; as, beauty is an accident.|--|(n.) Unusual appearance or effect.|--|)


noun

1. an undesirable or unfortunate happening that occurs unintentionally and usually results in harm, injury, damage, or loss; casualty; mishap: automobile accidents.

2. Law. such a happening resulting in injury that is in no way the fault of the injured person for which compensation or indemnity is legally sought.

3. any event that happens unexpectedly, without a deliberate plan or cause.

4. chance; fortune; luck: I was there by accident.

5. a fortuitous circumstance, quality, or characteristic: an accident of birth.

6. Philosophy. any entity or event contingent upon the existence of something else.

7. Geology. a surface irregularity, usually on a small scale, the reason for which is not apparent.


Examples:

"There can be accident victims."
"There can be accident insurances."
"There can be accident estimates."
"There can be accident sites."
"There can be accident reports."
"There can be accident inquiries."
"There can be accident investigators."
"There can be accident preventions."
"There can be accident datas."
"There can be accident investigations."
"There can be accident whiles."
"There can be accident records."
"There can be accident occureds."
"There can be accident fires."
"There can be accident offices."
"There can be accident scenes."
"There can be accident plans."
"There can be accident statistics."
"There can be accident compensations."
"There can be accident claims."

Origin:
Late Middle English (in the general sense ‘an event’): via Old French from Latin accident- ‘happening’, from the verb accidere, from ad- ‘towards, to’ + cadere ‘to fall’.

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List of Nouns by Length

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